Archive for the 'Recipes' Category

Kabocha Squash Soup

by 2018 intern Brian Landers

Ingredients

Kabocha squash     4 lb
Onion     1 lb
Parsnip     ½ lb
Garlic     2 cloves
Carrot     ½ lb
Pickled jalapeños     2 ea
Apple cider     2 cups
Stock or water     1 gal
Bread     ¼ loaf
Oil
Salt and pepper

 

Method

1. Break the stem off the squash and discard. Cut the squash in half, scoop the seeds out, and then season the cut side with oil, salt and pepper. Roast in 400° oven and check after 45 minutes.
2. While the squash is roasting, peel and chop the parsnip, onion, carrot, and garlic then toss them in oil, salt and pepper. Deseed and chop the jalapeños.
3. When the squash is finished, its flesh will be tender and the skin will be easy to pull off with a fork. Pull it out and roast the other vegetables at 500° until caramelized.
4. After the veggies in the oven are done, add them to a large pot with the jalapeños (with some of their pickling liquid) and the apple cider. Bring to a rolling boil and reduce the liquid by half. Add the squash and stock and bring to a boil again.
5. Blend with a food processor or food mill. Make croutons and serve on top of hot soup. Other garnishes could be tortillas, sour cream, hot sauce, yogurt, or fresh herbs.

Quince Tarte Tatin

by 2018 intern Brian Landers

Ingredients

Crust
Flour     1 cup
Salt    1 tsp
Sugar    2 tbsp
Cinnamon    ½ tsp
Nutmeg    ¼ tsp
Butter    ½-inch cubes 6 tbsp
Ice water    3 tbsp, maybe more

Filling
Quince,    8 medium, poached
Sugar    2/3 cup
Butter   ½-inch cubes    5 tbsp

Method

1. Peel, half and core the quince. Place in a pot just covered with hot water. Add 1 cup of sugar, and simmer until quince are soft. Remove from heat and drain the sugar water off the quince by setting them in a colandar for a few minutes.
2. Thoroughly mix the dry ingredients for the crust then toss the cubes of butter with the mixture to coat. Break the cubes into flat, pea-sized pieces with your fingertips or pastry blender, working quickly to avoid heating the butter.
3. One tablespoon at a time, sprinkle the ice water into the butter and flour, then mix with a fork until it starts to combine but a dusting of dry flour is still visible. Gently form into a ball, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least an hour.
4. Pour the sugar in a cast-iron pan and put it on the stove at low heat. Toss and swirl the sugar in the pan to make sure it melts evenly. It’s tempting to use a fork or spoon, but don’t – putting a utensil in the sugar will make it more likely to crystalize. You can wipe down the sides of the pan with a pastry brush dampened with water.
5. After the sugar cooks to an amber color, turn off the heat and add the butter while whisking vigorously. When all the butter is incorporated, arrange the quince in the pan – squeeze them in! The fruit will release water while cooking, so it’s okay if the caramel starts to harden.
6. Preheat your oven to 350° F.
7. Turn the stove on to low heat, place the tarte crust on top of the fruit, and cook until the caramel starts to bubble on the outside of your pan. Place in the preheated oven and check after 16 minutes. The crust should look golden-brown and delicious when it’s finished. Let rest on the counter for 2 hours or until the caramel sets again.
8. If needed, put the pan back on very low heat to loosen the caramel. (Place your palm on the top of the crust and slowly rotate to see if the whole pastry slides; if it does, it’s softened enough,) Put a cutting board or plate over the pan and flip upside down to release the tarte.
9. Slice and serve with whipped cream or ice cream.

Vinaigrette

This is Joanne’s perfect Salad Dressing
6 Tablespoons olive oil
3 Tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 Tablespoon Water
1 Tablespoon mustard
1-2 cloves minced garlic
1 Tablespoon nutritional yeast
salt and pepper to taste.